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Five ways to help kids boost their brain power

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Updated: 11/15/2012 11:14 am
(BPT) - - Everyone is born with about 100 billion brain cells. We form new connections between these cells throughout life, but the rate is particularly high when we're young. Since those connections facilitate thinking and learning, parents who want to help give their children an intellectual edge should consider the brain-healthy choices they make each day. "Making the effort to nurture your child's brain with both proper nutrients and varied experiences, especially when they are young and developing at such a fast rate, is crucial," says speech pathologist Lauren Zimet, founder of Early Insights, LLC, and an expert on childhood brain development. "The connections in brain circuitry can be enhanced through the environments and activities a child is exposed to, and participates in, as well as the nutrients a child consumes." Zimet offers five tips to help parents enhance healthy brain development in their children, positioning them for success in school today, and well into their future: 1. Select a rainbow It's no secret that the benefits of fresh fruits and vegetables are numerous, but thanks to the results of ongoing research, you can confidently add brain health to that list. Encourage your children to eat a colorful array of produce (organic when possible) each day so they get the antioxidants, vitamins and minerals needed to nourish and protect their growing brains. If your child is resistant to eating produce, encourage them to come shopping with you and select something new to try. Kids are more likely to eat what they have selected themselves. 2. Relax the right way While it's true that exercise boosts brain power, it's also important to teach children how to relax. Balancing activity with relaxation is important so that kids don't get too stressed, which can impact the brain's development and lead to learning and behavior problems. Teaching children early on the benefit of setting goals, working towards those goals, and giving their brain and body time to relax are important life skills. When it's time to relax, skip the TV and teach your child that taking a walk in nature, reading a book or drawing are great ways to unwind. Deep breathing is also an excellent practice to teach children of all ages. 3. Eat omega-3 brain food Omega-3 essential fatty acids are critical to a child's brain development. They are called "essential" because we need them for optimal health. The problem is that our bodies cannot manufacture them and we can only get them from the food we eat or supplements we take. While fish, nuts and seaweed are good omega-3 sources, kids typically don't gobble down these foods. That leaves many parents worried that their kids aren't getting enough, and with omega-3 deficits linked to ADHD, dyslexia and other behavioral and psychological disorders, many are turning to supplements for their children. Experts agree that the safest, most reliable source of the most important essential fatty acids (EPA and DHA) is a high quality fish oil supplement. Fortunately, there are purified, molecularly distilled fish oil supplements that are manufactured with kids in mind. Parents should be sure to choose one of these chewable, tasty options like those by Nordic Naturals to ensure success in getting their children to take the supplements. 4. Happy brains are hydrated brains Staying hydrated is important for growing brains and bodies. Water can improve energy, increase mental and physical performance, remove toxins and waste from the body, and keep skin healthy and glowing. Based on the trillions of cells in the body that need water to function, most nutritionists agree that children need more, not less H20. To estimate how many ounces of water your child should drink daily, divide his or her weight in half and aim for that number of ounces per day. 5. Be a positive support system early on Learning is a complex process, but children will be more open to trying new things when they know their parents believe in them. Acknowledging effort, instead of the outcome, strengthens a child's belief in himself or herself. Teaching goal setting, prioritizing activities and working off of check lists exercises the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the brain. Experimentation through trial and error is the way the brain learns best. "Giving your child's brain what it needs to grow strong can help him or her at school and in all social situations," adds Zimet. "Utilizing these tips is a great way to help position your child for success in the coming school year, and beyond."
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