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Neil Diamond happy 'Sweet Caroline' offers comfort

Neil Diamond, one of the recipients of the 2011 Kennedy Center Honors, poses for a photo following a dinner hosted by United States Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton at the U.S. Department of State December 3, 2011 in Washington, DC. President Barack Obama will host the five recipients of the 34th Kennedy Center Honors at a White House reception Sunday before attending the evening gala at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The 2011 honorees are actress Meryl Streep, singer Neil Diamond, actress Barbara Cook, musician Yo-Yo Ma, and musician Sonny Rollins. (Ron Sachs-Pool, Getty Images)
Neil Diamond, one of the recipients of the 2011 Kennedy Center Honors, poses for a photo following a dinner hosted by United States Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton at the U.S. Department of State December 3, 2011 in Washington, DC. President Barack Obama will host the five recipients of the 34th Kennedy Center Honors at a White House reception Sunday before attending the evening gala at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The 2011 honorees are actress Meryl Streep, singer Neil Diamond, actress Barbara Cook, musician Yo-Yo Ma, and musician Sonny Rollins. (Ron Sachs-Pool, Getty Images)
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Updated: 4/19/2013 1:44 pm

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Neil Diamond said he's happy his "Sweet Caroline," a staple of Boston Red Sox games, can provide comfort after the Boston Marathon bombing.

The New York Yankees, Toronto Raptors and other professional sports teams have played the song at games in the days after Monday's deadly blasts, with fans and players often singing along.

"There is a lot of comfort that music can offer," Diamond told The Associated Press. "In this particular situation, I'd much rather it not have happened than for 'Sweet Caroline' to become part of it. But it's obviously offering comfort to people and I feel good about that."

Diamond spoke Thursday night in Los Angeles at the Rock and Roll Hall induction ceremony. He said he intended the song, first released in 1969 and addressed to Caroline Kennedy, to offer solace.

"I wrote it in a hotel in Memphis, Tennessee," he said. "And I think there's a little bit of God in that song. I always have felt that. There's no accounting for what can happen to a song. But this one had something special to it."

 

©2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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